Israel Reyes is offering a look at something…

Israel Reyes is offering a look at something he calls “magic sand.” Its ability to stay dry is just one of many things which change when you go from “macro scale”  — the size things are in our daily lives — to “nano scale.” One such change is to the nature of surface tension, another change is to color.

Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education :: North Seattle Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

Volunteer Jennifer Sumstad often begins conversations by asking “Do you know what nanotechnology is?” and if kids say no, she explains “There are 1 BILLION nanometers in 1 meter.”

Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education :: North Seattle Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

The SHINE Technology program at North Seattle Community College brought several interactive items to demonstrate and which help share their knowledge, from that magic sand to a liquid crystal sheet which can display your hand print. It is a table with many connections to medical research and devices — you can even ask them about buckyballs.

About the Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education

The Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education (SHINE) was established by a 3-year, $861,646 National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education project grant to the Nanotechnology program at North Seattle Community College.

SHINE acts as a regional hub to promote awareness of the principles of nanoscience among the public, middle and high school students, and STEM educators, while expanding the diversity and number of trained nanotechnicians entering the local workforce and/or transferring to pursue Nanotechnology education at four-year institutions.

By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

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