Would you like to see a flatworm?

“Would you like to see a flatworm?” asks researcher and volunteer Kristina Krassovsky. “Yeah!” comes the inevitable reply, and would-be scientists line up to observe and interact with planaria which are themselves of several different ages.

Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

Planaria are “the regeneration experts” — if you separate one worm into 279 pieces, they grow into 279 worms!

Planaria also serve as model organisms for understanding human stem cells.

Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

NWABR offers resources for teaching about biomedical research and ethics, including our popular Stem Cell unit with “Plenty of Planaria” to model stem cell function, development, and the complexity of tissue regeneration.

The curriculum is geared towards high school students and available for download free of charge.

NWABR tables also share information about our other educational and outreach programs for students, such as the Student Biotech Expo. Learn more about this unique high school science fair by visiting the Expo page.

Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

Kristina Krassovsky is a student in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program at the University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is also one of a record number of researchers and volunteers with the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research at Life Sciences Research Weekend — roughly 250 volunteers in 2010.

NWABR thanks the following biomedical community volunteers who helped with our activity tables: Dawn Tessandore, Kristina Krassovsky, Lana Carolan, Wendy Crocker, Jane Gross, Martin Norris, Heather Sidener, Kathleen Cass, and Adrienne McKay. We thank also the NWABR staff who participated in Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010.

We especially congratulate Reitha Weeks, PhD our Resident Scientist and Program Manager, and organizer of another incredible Life Sciences Research Weekend. Thank you Reitha!

Reitha Weeks, PhD of NWABR visits with Tommy T-cell of BRI at Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

Tommy T-cell of BRI and Life Sciences Research Weekend organizer Reitha Weeks, PhD of NWABR

Blog author Brian Glanz, NWABR with Leena Pranikay, NWABR and Dawn Tessandore, teacher of AP Biology and more at Highline High School, and NWABR volunteer

Blog author Brian Glanz for NWABR with Leena Pranikay of NWABR and Dawn Tessandore, teacher at Highline High School and in NWABR’s Collaborations to Understand Research and Ethics program.

About the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research

The Northwest Association for Biomedical Research believes that understanding the lifesciences empowers individuals and society to make informed decisions about biomedicalresearch. We are a non-profit educational organization established in 1988 to promote thepublic understanding of biomedical research and its ethical conduct. Our work centers onsupporting excellence in science teaching, building connections between scientists andstudents, and strengthening the research community.

By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

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