Tagged: genomics Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Brian Glanz 2:10 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , genomics, model organisms,   

    Want to make your own DNA … 

    “Want to make your own DNA?” ask Oliver Serang and Leslie Emery, almost in unison. Both representing Genome Sciences at the University of Washington, they are eager to explain the mutant fruit flies, worms, and plants they and other researchers study.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    After Oliver has introduced some flies with normal wings, others with curly wings, then some with red eyes and others with white eyes, a visitor asks “Where do you find them?”

    “We make them!” he responds enthusiastically, continuing to introduce the basics of genetics and what they do in Genome Sciences.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Maureen Munn, Leslie Emery, and Oliver Serang of UW Genome Sciences

    Whether an organism is easy enough to grow is an important factor in what they decide to study, Oliver explains.

    The genetics of model organisms is a key which unlocks many doors to solving human diseases.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About Genome Sciences at the University of Washington

    The UW Department of Genome Sciences began in September 2001 by the fusion of the Departments of Genetics and Molecular Biotechnology.  Our goal is to address leading edge questions in biology and medicine by developing and applying genetic, genomic and computational approaches that take advantage of genomic information now available for humans, model organisms and a host of other species.

    Our faculty study a broad range of topics, including the genetics of E. coli, yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila, and mouse; human and medical genetics; mathematical, statistical and computer methods for analyzing genomes, and theoretical and evolutionary genetics; and genome-wide studies by such approaches as sequencing, transcriptional and translational analysis, polymorphism detection and identification of protein interactions.

    Not sure what Genome Sciences is all about? Follow these links for a basic overview of our research and streaming video of the 2009 Public Lecture Series.  Please follow this link to support our research.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

    Advertisements
     
  • Brian Glanz 1:40 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: fruit, , genomics, , plants, , Washington State University   

    Derick Jiwan is holding a small clear box… 

    Derick Jiwan is holding a small, clear box, just big enough to fit a baseball. To capture the attention of those passing by, now and again he announces: “We can grow an apple tree in this box.”

    Heads turn, looking for the box, until they realize Jiwan means the small, clear box in his hands. “Really?” is a typical response. Jiwan launches into explanations of photosynthesis, how plants grow and what they need, and next micropropagation. Down the hall in the Harry Potter exhibit, this would pass for magic.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Jiwan is in the Genomics Lab of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Washington State University, and he’s joined here today by Chris Hendrickson and Scott Schaeffer also from WSU. Together, they take us on a tour of fruit and medicinal plant genetics.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Tissue cultures and stem cells are discussed, and on that note we see tobacco being used for study. Why? because “it grows like a weed” Hendrickson says. Schaeffer teaches us about genes introduced to the local apples we all love eating, to help fight diseases typical for apples in the Pacific Northwest.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Magical and practical and delicious — the science of the fruit of the future!

    About the Horticulture Department at Washington State University

    The Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture is in the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences. Undergraduate degrees are offered in Landscape Architecture, Integrated Plant Sciences, and Agricultural and Food Systems. Graduate degrees are offered in both Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. The WSU Horticulture program was recently ranked number 8 in the nation, with the Plant Sciences program ranked number 2 by a survey in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Read more.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: