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  • Brian Glanz 5:18 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Welcome to the event blog for three days… 

    Welcome to the event blog for three days of hands-on activities for children and parents interested in meeting scientists and learning about the innovative life sciences research in our community. The event was co-presented by the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research (NWABR) and Pacific Science Center.

    “The Life Sciences Research Weekend is a fantastic opportunity for our young people to connect with the world renowned biotechnology institutions that call the Pacific Northwest home. I applaud their efforts to inspire students to pursue careers in the life sciences.” Senator Patty Murray

    More than 250 local researchers, volunteers, and staff from NWABR and Pacific Science Center represented 26 organizations, companies, and academic departments. Enjoy a virtual visit to the event with these photographs, stories, and links to additional resources. More than 10,000 visitors joined us at the event, and over 30,000 more people have visited this event blog.

    Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photos by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    "Thank Research" says a poster available via NWABR

    Posts in this event blog:

    Scroll down on the home page for all posts, or choose:

    What was in that flu shot?

    Do you want to take a test?

    Have you ever extracted DNA?!

    How the World Breathes

    Be a scientist!

    Discover the vital roles of animals in research

    Would you like to see a flatworm?

    The scientific method in action

    Do you know what DNA is?

    Blood and Guts and Science on Wheels

    Solving Puzzles for Science

    Make a protein bracelet

    Examine mutant flies, worms, and plants

    High tech simulations for health emergencies

    Trick your brain — optical and auditory illusions

    Fruit of the future

    How things change at very small scales

    Bioengineered devices

    Heart health, disease, and prevention

    Microbiology — What is creeping around your house?

    Neuroscience for Kids

    Virtual reality therapy with SnowWorld

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

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  • Brian Glanz 4:00 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: Amgen, antibodies, antibody models, , flu, germs, , molecular biology, pathogenic antigens, pathogens, therapeutics   

    What was in that flu shot? 

    It’s flu season, and a lot of the kids and parents stopping by the Amgen table start their conversation with “What was in that flu shot?”

    Eric Dobson and Nancy Salts of Amgen oblige with ready answers, and continue the conversation about how it works in fighting germs.

    Amgen :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    The general topic of their table is antibodies — their structure, function, and use as therapeutics.

    Colorful models are available for kids to play with, making antibodies:

    Amgen :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Amgen offer as much and as simple an explanation as is needed, helping the kids along:

    Amgen :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Amgen :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Amgen :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Older children may discuss the variable regions that fit the pathogenic antigens on model pathogens.

    About Amgen

    Amgen is a leading human therapeutics company in the biotechnology industry. For more than 25 years, the company has tapped the power of scientific discovery and innovation to advance the practice of medicine.

    Amgen pioneered the development of novel products based on advances in recombinant DNA and molecular biology and launched the biotechnology industry’s first blockbuster medicines. Today, as a Fortune 500 company serving millions of patients, Amgen continues to be an entrepreneurial, science-driven enterprise dedicated to helping people fight serious illness.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:50 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: arthritis, autoimmune diseases, Benaroya Research Institute, diabetes, immune system, lupus, multiple sclerosis, pancreas, scleroderma, T-cells   

    Do you want to take a test? 

    Crystal Rawlings of Benaroya Research Institute (BRI) asks the question so cheerfully that it sounds like fun: “Do you want to take a test?!” she says to someone passing by.

    “Sure,” comes a slightly skeptical reply. Rawlings follows up, “What do you know about diabetes?” and a few questions later, she has her captivated student paging through an activity book. “Can you circle the pancreas?” she asks, and he got it right!

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    BRI’s topic is autoimmune diseases, and they are here to share especially how T-cells regulate the immune system.

    To ensure all ages understand that T-cells are heroic, they invited a special guest — Tommy T-Cell, the autoimmune disease fighting superhero!

    “Would you like to have your picture taken with a superhero?” Rawlings asks. Everyone says yes to that question, and Rachel Martin of BRI slips away quietly. Moments later, Tommy T-Cell emerges …

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    … to smiles, cheers, and high-fives …

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    As everyone lines up to have their photo taken with Tommy T-Cell, Rawlings next plays the role of photographer. With a Polaroid camera, she snaps the photo then gives the print in return, pasted on a card with more information about T-cells and the Institute:

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Emma Lund-Curran, 7, and her family smile for a portrait with Tommy T-Cell

    Even Oliver Serang, of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington, can’t resist and jumps in for a photo with Tommy T-Cell:

    Benaroya Research Institute :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About Benaroya Research Institute

    Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason is an international leader in immune system and autoimmune disease research translating discoveries to real life applications. BRI is one of the few research institutes in the world dedicated to finding causes and cures to eliminate autoimmune diseases including Type 1 diabetes, arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, scleroderma and many others.

    Selected Scientific Achievements

    Community support is essential to continue this crucial work of unlocking the immune system and conquering Type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. Be a partner in unlocking the mysteries of the immune system.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:40 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: cell division, , genes, Institute for Systems Biology, systems biology   

    Have you ever extracted DNA?! 

    How do scientists use simple creatures to understand people?

    The many answers to that question can be appreciated by people of all ages, who are invited by the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) to watch cells divide, to see their DNA, and to try cool tools used by real scientists.

    Institute for Systems Biology :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    “Have you extracted DNA before?” asks a volunteer, drawing people into the conversation and in fact, you can extract DNA right at the ISB table.

    Institute for Systems Biology :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Kids might try a roll of the genetic dice, or take home an activity called “Harry Potter and the Genetic Code.”

    With ISB’s multimedia — videos and slideshows on multiple laptops — cell division is beautiful and fascinating.

    Institute for Systems Biology :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Adults especially have a lot to click through and investigate in this area and several researchers stand ready to answer questions.

    About the Institute for Systems Biology

    The Institute for Systems Biology was co-founded in 2000 by Alan Aderem, Ruedi Aebersold, and Leroy Hood. In just 10 years it has grown to more than 300 staff members, including 13 faculty members and their laboratory groups. This pioneering approach to the study of biological systems takes place in the institute’s 65,000-square-foot facility in Seattle.

    Building a new kind of research institute — one that can tackle the multi-disciplinary challenges of systems biology – requires a strategy that itself integrates many sciences including biology, chemistry, physics, computation, mathematics and medicine. Because the field of systems biology requires the seamless integration of these disciplines, ISB has developed a philosophy, an environment, and an administrative structure that transcends traditional organizational and disciplinary barriers. Scientists collaborate across their specialties to leverage knowledge and expertise with others at the Institute and in academia and industry.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:30 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: astrobiology, , carbon dioxide, Earth, Europa, extraterrestrial life, Mars, microbial respiration, oceanography, , Science Communication Fellows,   

    How the World Breathes 

    Jeff Bowman studies tiny life forms in extreme conditions

    Sampling sea ice in the Arctic Basin — photo provided by Jeff Bowman

    Jeff Bowman is a Science Communication Fellow with Pacific Science Center, and as you might imagine he has some incredible science to share!

    From the University of Washington in Seattle, to Alaska, to the North Pole! Jeff has traveled far while studying sea ice and microbial respiration — that is, the breathing of very small, very simple forms of life. He is interested in the survival mechanisms of bacteria in cold, salty environments.

    For Jeff, biological oceanography goes hand in hand with astrobiology. Scientists consider the icy moon of Europa, orbiting Jupiter, as perhaps the most likely host of extraterrestrial life in our solar system, and Mars may have similarly habitable environments. Scientists like Jeff study the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life here on Earth, and beyond.

    Jeff brings all this down to Earth, here at Life Sciences Research Weekend with a probe which measures the amount of carbon dioxide currently in the room. As the number of people grows, we can see data from the probe displayed live on one of Jeff’s laptops. The carbon dioxide grows in the room thanks to all of us breathing, up until the room’s ventilation system compensates — then the amount of carbon dioxide levels out on the graph, right before our eyes.

    Jeff also brought several tubes full of water, mud, and tiny living things from the nearby Duwamish River. He shares with us how they, too are breathing and the differences between their respiration and our own.

    University of Washington :: Department of Oceanography and Astrobiology :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Seeing all of this in person helps bring science to life — and who can resist wondering what might lurk in or under the ice of Europa : )

    About the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington

    The School of Oceanography fosters continued advancement of the ocean sciences, solutions to problems of societal relevance, and public awareness of the marine environment. It is at the forefront of creating knowledge and understanding about the ocean through observation, theory, modeling and technological innovation. The School focuses on learning and discovery, equipping students with knowledge and insights, scholarly methods, scientific tools and communication skills.

    About the Astrobiology Program at the University of Washington

    The Astrobiology Program investigates the wide range of multidisciplinary factors that may influence the origin and evolution of life on Earth and beyond.

    This investigation demands an intense interdisciplinarity, and the Astrobiology Program at the University of Washington is creating a new community of scholars, investigators, and educators. This community is skilled in multidisciplinary methods and thinking and pushes the boundaries beyond the commonplace with intellectual vigor, creativity, and rigorous method.

    Astrobiology at the University of Washington builds on the strengths of traditional academic structure to transcend the limits of specialization through the synergy of multidisciplinary cooperation in both research and education.

    About Science Communication Fellows at Pacific Science Center

    Science Communication Fellows are scientists, researchers and other science-based professionals who have been certified by Pacific Science Center as current science ambassadors and excellent communicators. Fellows join Pacific Science Center in inspiring lifelong interest in science, math and technology.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:20 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: emulsion, , , recipe, testing   

    Be a scientist! 

    Children were invited by the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research (NWABR) to be a scientist at Life Sciences Research Weekend. By carefully testing samples of skin care lotions and oils, discover which has the best recipe. You can also take a printed recipe home, with instructions for making your own lotion.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Bryn and Soren Harper, age 6, carefully testing and observing

    Skin care lotion ingredients include water, borax powder, beeswax, mineral oil, and coconut oil, plus an optional fragrance. Each of three lotion samples have just one thing different from the other, so we can test and observe the difference made by that one change.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    The sample without borax powder was “a goopy mess,” one observer described. “That’s because borax helps the water and oil to mix properly, if used with the beeswax” explained Dawn Tessandore, teacher of AP Biology and more at Highline High School and NWABR volunteer. This type of mixture is called an emulsion — and the borax — beeswax combination is the emulsifier between oil and water.

    Leena Pranikay of NWABR shares more of the “Be a scientist” activity:

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research

    The Northwest Association for Biomedical Research believes that understanding the lifesciences empowers individuals and society to make informed decisions about biomedicalresearch. We are a non-profit educational organization established in 1988 to promote thepublic understanding of biomedical research and its ethical conduct. Our work centers onsupporting excellence in science teaching, building connections between scientists andstudents, and strengthening the research community.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:15 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Discover the vital roles of animals in research 

    “Want to Play a Game?”

    A large “Wheel of Discovery” engages visitors in a fast-moving game to reveal the important roles animals have played in research for medicines and treatments. Kids can talk to scientists about what we have learned from the animals we work with.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

    Kathleen Cass and Jeanne Chowning, NWABR demonstrate the Wheel of Discovery

    With the Wheel of Discovery, kids can also win prizes as they learn! First, a scientist provides a clue and the player guesses the animal: “Without a single bone in its body, extract made from the cartilage of this predator has been found to shrink cancerous tumors.” Not sure of the answer yet? Another hint: “Seeing the fin of this animal in the water means it’s time to get ashore.”

    The answer is: a shark! and after discovering the right answer, the player spins the wheel to win a prize. Many animals are featured, from a mouse to a horse and children can learn how research with animals keeps both animals and people healthy.

    About the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research

    The Northwest Association for Biomedical Research believes that understanding the lifesciences empowers individuals and society to make informed decisions about biomedicalresearch. We are a non-profit educational organization established in 1988 to promote thepublic understanding of biomedical research and its ethical conduct. Our work centers onsupporting excellence in science teaching, building connections between scientists andstudents, and strengthening the research community.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:10 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , planaria, regeneration, research, , treatments   

    Would you like to see a flatworm? 

    “Would you like to see a flatworm?” asks researcher and volunteer Kristina Krassovsky. “Yeah!” comes the inevitable reply, and would-be scientists line up to observe and interact with planaria which are themselves of several different ages.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Planaria are “the regeneration experts” — if you separate one worm into 279 pieces, they grow into 279 worms!

    Planaria also serve as model organisms for understanding human stem cells.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    NWABR offers resources for teaching about biomedical research and ethics, including our popular Stem Cell unit with “Plenty of Planaria” to model stem cell function, development, and the complexity of tissue regeneration.

    The curriculum is geared towards high school students and available for download free of charge.

    NWABR tables also share information about our other educational and outreach programs for students, such as the Student Biotech Expo. Learn more about this unique high school science fair by visiting the Expo page.

    Northwest Association for Biomedical Research :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Kristina Krassovsky is a student in the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program at the University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. She is also one of a record number of researchers and volunteers with the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research at Life Sciences Research Weekend — roughly 250 volunteers in 2010.

    NWABR thanks the following biomedical community volunteers who helped with our activity tables: Dawn Tessandore, Kristina Krassovsky, Lana Carolan, Wendy Crocker, Jane Gross, Martin Norris, Heather Sidener, Kathleen Cass, and Adrienne McKay. We thank also the NWABR staff who participated in Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010.

    We especially congratulate Reitha Weeks, PhD our Resident Scientist and Program Manager, and organizer of another incredible Life Sciences Research Weekend. Thank you Reitha!

    Reitha Weeks, PhD of NWABR visits with Tommy T-cell of BRI at Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

    Tommy T-cell of BRI and Life Sciences Research Weekend organizer Reitha Weeks, PhD of NWABR

    Blog author Brian Glanz, NWABR with Leena Pranikay, NWABR and Dawn Tessandore, teacher of AP Biology and more at Highline High School, and NWABR volunteer

    Blog author Brian Glanz for NWABR with Leena Pranikay of NWABR and Dawn Tessandore, teacher at Highline High School and in NWABR’s Collaborations to Understand Research and Ethics program.

    About the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research

    The Northwest Association for Biomedical Research believes that understanding the lifesciences empowers individuals and society to make informed decisions about biomedicalresearch. We are a non-profit educational organization established in 1988 to promote thepublic understanding of biomedical research and its ethical conduct. Our work centers onsupporting excellence in science teaching, building connections between scientists andstudents, and strengthening the research community.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 3:00 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: cardiology, , hypothesis, , , scientific method, Swedish Medical Center, test tubes   

    The scientific method in action 

    Swedish Medical Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Cecile Krejsa, Melissa Rosscup, and Sarah Powell of Swedish Medical Center offer activities “from pipette to purpose,” leading their young guests through the steps of the scientific method with several colorful and unusual activities.

    The kids enjoy using pipettes and test tubes to mix colored water. Before they do, one of the scientists says “Let’s make a hypothesis — that means you try to predict what will happen. What color do you think you will get?” from mixing, for example, yellow and blue water. After mixing them together, the kids are asked to compare the result to the hypothesis.

    Swedish Medical Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Cecile Krejsa, Melissa Rosscup, and Sarah Powell of Swedish Medical Center

    Along the way, they discuss related questions, such as “What is a milliliter?” or for older kids, “What makes a well designed experiment?”

    There are coloring books available, with pictures of hearts per the cardiology themed table — but those are being ignored, with more exciting things to do — like touching a real pig’s heart!

    Swedish Medical Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Swedish Medical Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    It’s clear that kids enjoy using real lab equipment, even in the most basic experiments, and they love meeting real scientists.

    About Swedish Medical Center

    Established in 1910, Swedish Medical Center has grown over the last 100 years to become the largest, most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the Greater Seattle area with 8,500 employees, 3,000-physicians and 1,200-volunteers. It is comprised of four hospital campuses – First Hill, Cherry Hill, Ballard and Edmonds – a freestanding emergency department and ambulatory care center in Issaquah, Swedish Visiting Nurse Services, and the Swedish Physician Division – a network of more than 40 primary-care and specialty clinics located throughout the Puget Sound area.

    In addition to general medical and surgical care, Swedish is known as a regional referral center, providing specialized treatment in areas such as cardiovascular care, cancer care, neuroscience, orthopedics, high-risk obstetrics, pediatric specialties, organ transplantation and clinical research.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 2:50 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , dna extraction, ,   

    Do you know what DNA is? 

    At this table presented by the South Lake Union Group of UW Medicine, volunteers including Kassandra Thomson, PhD student in Bioengineering invite kids to extract DNA from strawberries.

    That’s right, kids of all ages can squish up strawberries and, in a few more steps, extract their DNA — even if at first they don’t what DNA is. Kassandra starts with the most basic questions, and this vibrant activity naturally draws people in.

    UW Medicine :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    The DNA isolation protocol, for middle and/or high school students is available for download courtesy of the Science Education Partnership funded by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, along with other educational resources from the Open Science Foundation event blog of NWABR DNA Day in March 2010.

    About UW Medicine

    UW Medicine’s mission is to improve the health of the public by advancing medical knowledge, providing outstanding primary and specialty care to the people of the region, and preparing tomorrow’s physicians, scientists and other health professionals.

    UW Medicine owns or operates Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, a network of seven UW Medicine Neighborhood Clinics that provide primary care, the UW School of Medicine, the physician practice UW Physicians and Airlift Northwest. In addition, UW Medicine shares in the ownership and governance of Children’s University Medical Group and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, a partnership among UW Medicine, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Seattle Children’s.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 2:40 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: anatomy, arteries, human body, muscles, nerves, organs, , Science on Wheels, skeletons   

    Blood and Guts and Science on Wheels 

    The “Blood and Guts” demonstration from Pacific Science Center’s Science on Wheels challenges students to uncover the amazing aspects of their insides!

    Experts Rachel Shoulder and Alycia Prekaski introduce Fred, the skeleton to teach us about ourselves:

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Rachel Shoulder and Fred, the Science On Wheels skeleton

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    With a fleet of seven different vans and myriad possible programs, from a 30 minute demonstration to a full day of exhibits, Science on Wheels takes its a mini science center to locations all over the state of Washington. Exhibits are hands-on, with inquiry based puzzles, experiments, and activities.

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    In “Blood and Guts,” we explore arteries, muscles, nerves, organs — everything that keeps us alive and kicking.

    Science On Wheels :: Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About Pacific Science Center’s Science On Wheels

    Pacific Science Center’s Science On Wheels program is proud to enhance science and math learning in schools and community events across Washington state. From a 40-minute science show to a full day experience, Pacific Science Center can tailor programs to excite your kids and pique their interest in the fascinating world of science! From school days to evening events to weekend venues, see what Pacific Science Center has to offer to schools, preschools, PTA evenings, science fairs, scout groups, camps, libraries, afterschool programs, fairs and more!

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 2:30 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: 3D models, biochemistry, BOINC, Computer Science and Engineering, computers, data, fold.it, games, protein folding, ,   

    Solving Puzzles for Science 

    Postdoctoral researcher Firas Khatib and Baker Lab mate James Moody float from computer to computer, recruiting everyone who will listen to join the quest to cure cancer and many other infamous diseases — by playing video games!

     

    Fold.it :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Researchers Firas Khatib and James Moody demonstrate Fold.it.

    Can the brainpower of people volunteering around the world solve a computational problem so huge that all the computers in the world couldn’t solve it? In 2010, every field of science seems to have a “Big Data” problem but the data about proteins are as Khatib describes, “really, really big.”

    Predicting the structures of disease related proteins is both one of the most promising and the most daunting problems in biology. Uses for designed proteins include fighting HIV, malaria, cancer, and Alzheimer’s.

    Incredibly and wonderfully, there is something we can all do to help. Fold.it is the relatively new part of the answer, and its origins are an intriguing story in the saga of humans v. machines, brains v. computers.

    Fold.it :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    The Rosetta@home screensaver project began just over five years ago, in 2005. You can still download and run the program on your own computer, contributing your extra computing resources to a project which has now been helped by almost 1 million volunteered computers.

    Many obsess over their statistics, whether contributing on their own or competing in teams. I, NWABR blog author Brian Glanz contribute via the International High IQ Society BOINC platform team, which last I looked was in about 820th place in the world, just ahead of University College London and we had recently pulled ahead of my old team, slashdot. I had originally joined SETI@home, precursor to BOINC on which Rosetta@home et al. now run, in 1999 and my team in 2002.

    Why obsess so, over the stats? Even in the early days of SETI@home, contributing became a competition which has helped fuel advances in distributed computing and other fields. Of course this also benefits the science depending on these computing resources, which are far beyond those commonly available in one’s own lab. What Geeks will do to out-geek each other, in the name of science, has been wonderful to watch in these ten years 🙂

    Once upon a time, Khatib describes, people running the Rosetta@home screen saver noticed that the program was making mistakes. They wanted to interact, to correct the computer — and got in touch with project leaders in David Baker‘s lab in the University of Washington Department of Biochemistry.

    Fold.it was the result — an interactive Rosetta-based program developed by the Baker Lab and the University of Washington’s Computer Science and Engineering. “I didn’t even know that!” mused Jeff Flatten of UW CSE, who was helping people try Fold.it as Firas Khatib told the story of its origins.

    Fold.it :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    People have 3D problem solving skills which are, in many cases superior to those of computers. People can guide the computers, and with the game they can manipulate models of protein structures to speed up the processing over all.

    Fold.it :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Dawn Tessandore, teacher of AP Biology at Highline High School came to the table at Life Sciences Research Weekend and asked “Do you have something online I can take my class to?”

    Firas Khatib enthusiastically responded “Of course!” and handed Tessandore a print-out with the URL — Fold.it.

     

    Fold.it :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Jeff Flatten, James Moody, and Firas Khatib are amused as blog author Brian Glanz breaks a LOT of bonds -- to make the photo more interesting! of course 🙂

    You, too can contribute to science by playing Fold.it on your computer. It is free to download and fun to play.

    Fold.it competitions are especially popular in schools! The above photo, Fold.it, and this story are also featured in biology text books published by Scholastic Inc.

    About the University of Washington Department of Biochemistry

    Modern biochemical research is based on the premise that life can ultimately be explained as a coordinated series of chemical reactions. The field grew steadily through the first half of the 20th century, then explosively after the discovery of the genetic material that is DNA.

    Today, biochemistry includes the structure and function of the protein, RNA, and membrane components that carry out life processes (structural biology and biophysics). It also includes regulation of the genes that encode these components (molecular and systems biology), functional integration of these components within cells and tissues (cell and developmental biology), and coordination of the myriad components responsible for complex behaviors in unicellular and multicellular organisms (neurobiology, immunology, physiology, and microbiology).

    Just as importantly, progress in basic science has inevitably led to progress in understanding the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases as diverse as cancer, obesity, muscular dystrophy, and malaria. The Department of Biochemistry at the University of Washington has contributed to many phases of this research.

    About UW Computer Science and Engineering

    University of Washington Computer Science & Engineering includes roughly fifty faculty members, fifty staff members, three hundred graduate majors (165 in the Doctoral program and 135 in the Professional Masters Program), and five hundred undergraduate majors (160 graduates per year) in Computer Science and Computer Engineering programs. Ranked among the top ten programs in the nation, we are active in most of the principal areas of the field, and are engaged in a broad range of interdisciplinary initiatives. We are located in the spectacular Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering at the center of the UW campus in Seattle, Washington – a national and international technology center in software, biotech, the health sciences, and other fields.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
    • Renton 9:02 am on November 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Hey, let me know your address Firas !! I would like to send you a t-shirt from New Zealand to replace that old Australian one. *grin*

  • Brian Glanz 2:20 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Make a protein bracelet 

    Pacific Science Center offers a simple and fun introduction to proteins with the “Make a protein bracelet” activity.

    Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    As one very young visitor began making her bracelet, the PSC staffer asked “Do you know what proteins do?” and to a negative shake of the head, continued “They are really good! They help your cells!”

    Pacific Science Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Simple activities can go a long way toward connecting with all ages at Life Sciences Research Weekend.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 2:10 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , , model organisms,   

    Want to make your own DNA … 

    “Want to make your own DNA?” ask Oliver Serang and Leslie Emery, almost in unison. Both representing Genome Sciences at the University of Washington, they are eager to explain the mutant fruit flies, worms, and plants they and other researchers study.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    After Oliver has introduced some flies with normal wings, others with curly wings, then some with red eyes and others with white eyes, a visitor asks “Where do you find them?”

    “We make them!” he responds enthusiastically, continuing to introduce the basics of genetics and what they do in Genome Sciences.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Maureen Munn, Leslie Emery, and Oliver Serang of UW Genome Sciences

    Whether an organism is easy enough to grow is an important factor in what they decide to study, Oliver explains.

    The genetics of model organisms is a key which unlocks many doors to solving human diseases.

    Genome Sciences at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About Genome Sciences at the University of Washington

    The UW Department of Genome Sciences began in September 2001 by the fusion of the Departments of Genetics and Molecular Biotechnology.  Our goal is to address leading edge questions in biology and medicine by developing and applying genetic, genomic and computational approaches that take advantage of genomic information now available for humans, model organisms and a host of other species.

    Our faculty study a broad range of topics, including the genetics of E. coli, yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila, and mouse; human and medical genetics; mathematical, statistical and computer methods for analyzing genomes, and theoretical and evolutionary genetics; and genome-wide studies by such approaches as sequencing, transcriptional and translational analysis, polymorphism detection and identification of protein interactions.

    Not sure what Genome Sciences is all about? Follow these links for a basic overview of our research and streaming video of the 2009 Public Lecture Series.  Please follow this link to support our research.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 2:00 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: body functions, Renton Technical College, simulation   

    Renton Technical College returns to Life Sciences Research Weekend with… 

    Renton Technical College returns to Life Sciences Research Weekend with the popular “SimMan” and “SimBaby.”

    Renton Technical College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

    Renton Technical College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

    These high tech, anatomically correct mannequins can mimic many diseases and normal body functions.

    Renton Technical College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010

    Evaluating a baby’s health can be difficult, so SimBaby safely represents a six-month old baby for nurses to study and practice with. For more about SimMan or SimBaby, see the Laerdal company web site: http://www.laerdal.com/doc/13010668/SimBaby.html

    About Renton Technical College

    Renton Technical College (RTC) is one of 34 colleges in the State of Washington operated by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. RTC provides training, retraining and upgrading for persons seeking marketable job skills or upgrading current skills.

    Training at Renton Technical College is relevant. The worker of tomorrow is trained by the journey-level instructor of today. Trainees are ensured that only those skills and concepts essential for seeking, gaining and holding a job are taught. At the same time, they are guaranteed they will not be taught superfluous skills and concepts. Mathematical, scientific, communication and human relation skills are integrated into practical instruction.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:50 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: behavior, brain, illusion, neurobiology, perception, sensation,   

    What is that most people say… 

    “What is that?!” most people say as they approach the table presented by the University of Washington’s Neurobiology and Behavior Community Outreach.

    The answer: a Jello mold of a human brain — and, you can touch it! which is interesting because it does, in fact feel a lot like a real human brain.

    UW Neurobiology and Behavior Community Outreach :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    “What do we have to keep our brains protected?” asks Sammi Moen, of a young visitor to the table, striking up a conversation about brain health.

    UW Neurobiology and Behavior Community Outreach :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Sammi and Sofia Penn are both students in the neurobiology program at UW. Sofia presents optical illusions to interested older guests, discussing sensation and perception and the adaptive brain.

    About Neurobiology and Behavior Community Outreach at UW

    Neurobiology and Behavior Community Outreach share knowledge and experience in neuroscience with a wide range of audiences that include students at all levels — from elementary through adult education.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:40 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: fruit, , , , plants, , Washington State University   

    Derick Jiwan is holding a small clear box… 

    Derick Jiwan is holding a small, clear box, just big enough to fit a baseball. To capture the attention of those passing by, now and again he announces: “We can grow an apple tree in this box.”

    Heads turn, looking for the box, until they realize Jiwan means the small, clear box in his hands. “Really?” is a typical response. Jiwan launches into explanations of photosynthesis, how plants grow and what they need, and next micropropagation. Down the hall in the Harry Potter exhibit, this would pass for magic.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Jiwan is in the Genomics Lab of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Washington State University, and he’s joined here today by Chris Hendrickson and Scott Schaeffer also from WSU. Together, they take us on a tour of fruit and medicinal plant genetics.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Tissue cultures and stem cells are discussed, and on that note we see tobacco being used for study. Why? because “it grows like a weed” Hendrickson says. Schaeffer teaches us about genes introduced to the local apples we all love eating, to help fight diseases typical for apples in the Pacific Northwest.

    Horticulture Department :: Washington State University :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Magical and practical and delicious — the science of the fruit of the future!

    About the Horticulture Department at Washington State University

    The Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture is in the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences. Undergraduate degrees are offered in Landscape Architecture, Integrated Plant Sciences, and Agricultural and Food Systems. Graduate degrees are offered in both Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. The WSU Horticulture program was recently ranked number 8 in the nation, with the Plant Sciences program ranked number 2 by a survey in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Read more.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:30 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: buckyballs, ferrofluid, , nanotechnology   

    Israel Reyes is offering a look at something… 

    Israel Reyes is offering a look at something he calls “magic sand.” Its ability to stay dry is just one of many things which change when you go from “macro scale”  — the size things are in our daily lives — to “nano scale.” One such change is to the nature of surface tension, another change is to color.

    Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education :: North Seattle Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Volunteer Jennifer Sumstad often begins conversations by asking “Do you know what nanotechnology is?” and if kids say no, she explains “There are 1 BILLION nanometers in 1 meter.”

    Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education :: North Seattle Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    The SHINE Technology program at North Seattle Community College brought several interactive items to demonstrate and which help share their knowledge, from that magic sand to a liquid crystal sheet which can display your hand print. It is a table with many connections to medical research and devices — you can even ask them about buckyballs.

    About the Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education

    The Seattle Hub for Industry-driven Nanotechnology Education (SHINE) was established by a 3-year, $861,646 National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education project grant to the Nanotechnology program at North Seattle Community College.

    SHINE acts as a regional hub to promote awareness of the principles of nanoscience among the public, middle and high school students, and STEM educators, while expanding the diversity and number of trained nanotechnicians entering the local workforce and/or transferring to pursue Nanotechnology education at four-year institutions.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:20 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: bioengineering, ,   

    Graduate student Alex Jiao and Undergraduate Seniors Jon… 

    Graduate student Alex Jiao and Undergraduate Seniors Jon McMichael and David Frolov are having an animated conversation about where some of the mysterious devices they brought today are used in the body. They also brought a game, for kids to match devices to their uses.

    They all hail from the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington, where the slogan is “Inventing the future of medicine.”

    Department of Bioengineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Have you actually seen the bits that make up a total knee replacement? Or heard what’s in it — titanium, or cobalt -chrome  — metal mostly, and they’re getting into ceramics. With a totally replaced knee, you can get back in a swimming pool, or on the golf course.

    Department of Bioengineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society at the University of Washington :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    About the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington

    For more about the Department of Bioengineering, see http://depts.washington.edu/bioe/about/about_index.html.

    About the Biomedical Engineering Society at the University of Washington

    The society serves as a central hub by uniting graduate and undergraduate students interested in bioengineering with other students, faculty members, and local and national community members and professionals. For more, see http://students.washington.edu/bmesuw/.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:10 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: engineered biomaterials, , Hope Heart Institute,   

    For many improving heart health should start with… 

    For many, improving heart health should start with reading labels — nutrition information and ingredients for the foods we eat. That’s the lesson Laurie Sween and Suzanne Vogt of The Hope Heart Institute wanted to make sure we took home from their activity table.

    Hope Heart Institute and UW Engineered Biomaterials :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    To help us get the message, they brought their “lard lesson,” which helped visualize the fat in food and its effect on our bodies, our blood vessels especially.

    Hope Heart Institute and UW Engineered Biomaterials :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Cheerfully but seriously, we were invited to participate in an activity with turkey basters — one with fat in it, the other not. By pumping these, we could get a feel for how much harder it is for our hearts to pump blood if we’ve eaten unhealthy, fatty foods.

     

    Hope Heart Institute and UW Engineered Biomaterials :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Suzanne Vogt and Laurie Sween of The Hope Heart Institute

     

    About The Hope Heart Institute

    The Hope Heart Institute has a 50-year history of revolutionary medical advances and educational curricula that make heart disease – America’s No. 1 cause of death – more treatable, beatable, and preventable. The mission of the Hope Heart Institute is serving humanity through cardiovascular research and education. For more, visit http://www.hopeheart.org/.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 1:00 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: , , , microbiology, MRSA, , Shoreline Community College   

    Biotechnology is a lot of fun at Shoreline… 

    Biotechnology Department at Shoreline Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Biotechnology is a lot of fun at Shoreline Community College‘s activity table, featuring samples of “bacteria from around your house” from the Biotechnology Department. Students in the program, including Ricardo Rosas and William Robertson are happy to show and answer questions about bacteria from such sources as “refrigerator shelf,” “kitchen sink,” or “cat tongue.”

    Another student volunteering at Life Sciences Research Weekend, Nalina Nagarajan noted that kids were eager to learn about bacteria and had asked about MRSA, the bacterial infection that is highly resistant to some antibiotics.

    Biotechnology Department at Shoreline Community College :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    At the same table, kids can try using real microbiology lab equipment. One younger kid is using a pipette to transfer colored water to a series of microwells — and making a rainbow pattern.

    Adrienne Houck, Biotechnology Outreach Coordinator was pleased with the turn out from both students in the program at Shoreline and from the school groups and families visiting Pacific Science Center. “It’s great that our Biotech students are volunteering” she said. Speaking on Friday, a school day and the first of three days for the event, Houck added “I like that there are field trips here today, so kids who have never been to a science center before can hold a pipette, and experience all this.”

    About the Biotechnology Department at Shoreline Community College

    Biotechnology is an exciting and rapidly expanding field. Biologists and other scientists working in research and development use biotechnology techniques for the production of genetically engineered drugs, gene therapy, microbiology, virology, forensic science, agriculture and environmental science. Biotechnology laboratories are found in educational institutions, public health facilities and private corporations.

    The Biotechnology Laboratory Specialist Program at Shoreline Community College prepares students for careers in biotechnology research and development. The program goal is to provide practical, “hands-on” learning and familiarity with cutting edge techniques, technologies, and equipment. Students gain a working knowledge of molecular biology, recombinant DNA, immunology, protein purification and tissue culture — both through classroom lectures and laboratory learning experiences. The curriculum also provides a foundation in a variety of math and science disciplines including algebra, statistics, chemistry, biology, microbiology and computer science.

    The Biotechnology Program offers students great flexibility, including an AAAS degree, a Certificate of Proficiency, and internships in local biotechnology labs.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 12:50 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: neuroscience, ,   

    Dr Eric Chudler PhD presented an interactive demonstration… 

    Dr. Eric Chudler, PhD presented an interactive demonstration of “Neuroscience for Kids” at Life Sciences Research Weekend. One of the activities Chudler often presents is “Colors and the Famous Stroop Effect.” From Chudler’s web site:

    The famous “Stroop Effect” is named after J. Ridley Stroop who discovered this strange phenomenon in the 1930s. Here is your job: name the colors of the following words. Do NOT read the words…rather, say the color of the words. For example, if the word “BLUE” is printed in a red color, you should say “RED”. Say the colors as fast as you can. It is not as easy as you might think!

    For more on the Stroop Effect, see http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/words.html.

    Chudler’s web site is a rich resource for teachers, or for parents and kids to enjoy on their own. Below is a video about the site shared by UW Medicine:

    About Neuroscience for Kids

    Neuroscience for Kids was created for all students and teachers who would like to learn about the nervous system.

    Discover the exciting world of the brain, spinal cord, neurons and the senses. Use the experiments, activities and games to help you learn about the nervous system. There are plenty of links to other web sites for you to explore.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 12:40 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: Harborview, , , virtual reality   

    Hunter Hoffman uses virtual reality to reduce both… 

    UW HIT Lab and Harborview Burn Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Hunter Hoffman uses virtual reality to reduce both fear and pain. At the Human Interface Technology Lab at the University of Washington, Hoffman researches ways to reduce pain and suffering using computer worlds that look and feel a lot like video games.

    Donna Fontaine, now of Cynergy Systems studied at the HIT Lab and was one of several researchers on hand to explain how all this works at Life Sciences Research Weekend. Fontaine mentioned that the more convincing a world is, the better it works to help reduce the experience of pain.

    UW HIT Lab and Harborview Burn Center :: Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photo by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Helping guide visitors through SnowWorld today are volunteers Devon Anne Brown from the University of Washington, and Aubriana Teeley, on staff at Harborview Burn Center, part of UW Medicine. Teeley takes this treatment straight to patients.

    Below is a video which documents and demonstrates SnowWorld, shared by ScienCentral News:

    About the Human Interface Technology Laboratory

    The Human Interface Technology Laboratory at the University of Washington is a multi-disciplinary research and development lab whose work centers around human interface technology. Lab researchers represent a wide range of departments from across the University of Washington campus, including engineering, medicine, education, social sciences, architecture and the design arts.

    About the UW Burn Center at Harborview

    Since its opening in 1974, the UW Burn Center at Harborview has treated more than 15,000 patients, including almost all burn patients in Washington. Harborview was one of the first hospitals to adopt the approach of early removal of burned tissue, and was the first site of a major clinical trial for a temporary artificial skin graft, a technology that continues to advance. The survival rate at Harborview’s burn unit is about 96 percent.

    Especially important is the reduced length of hospital stay for most patients, enabling them to return to their lives as soon as possible. Most patients are back at work within a few months and children rarely, if ever, miss a year of school.

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
  • Brian Glanz 12:30 pm on November 5, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Thank you for visiting the virtual version of… 

    Thank you for visiting the virtual version of Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010. This has been the fourth annual event and we look forward to next year! The event was co-presented by the Northwest Association for Biomedical Research and Pacific Science Center.

    More than 250 local researchers, volunteers, and staff represented 26 organizations, companies, and academic departments. Nearly 10,000 guests visited Pacific Science Center during Life Sciences Research Weekend, and there were more than 1,000 unique visitors to this event blog in its first week. There have been more than 30,000 visitors to this blog all-time, better than tripling the event attendance. Thank you!

    Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 was blogged by Brian Glanz for NWABR

    Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 was blogged by Brian Glanz for NWABR

    Life Sciences Research Weekend 2010 :: Photos by Mohini Patel Glanz

    Photography by Mohini Patel Glanz.

    Posts in this event blog:

    Scroll down on the home page for all posts, or choose:

    What was in that flu shot?

    Do you want to take a test?

    Have you ever extracted DNA?!

    How the World Breathes

    Be a scientist!

    Discover the vital roles of animals in research

    Would you like to see a flatworm?

    The scientific method in action

    Do you know what DNA is?

    Blood and Guts and Science on Wheels

    Solving Puzzles for Science

    Make a protein bracelet

    Examine mutant flies, worms, and plants

    High tech simulations for health emergencies

    Trick your brain — optical and auditory illusions

    Fruit of the future

    How things change at very small scales

    Bioengineered devices

    Heart health, disease, and prevention

    Microbiology — What is creeping around your house?

    Neuroscience for Kids

    Virtual reality therapy with SnowWorld

    By Brian Glanz for NWABR. Please reuse and remix! We share with a Creative Commons Attribution License.

     
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